A Day in the Chicken Lab

Vigilant male chickens at Macquarie University (courtesy of K-lynn Smith)

While I’m in Australia, I’m staying with a friend, K-lynn Smith, who is an animal behavior scientist at Macquarie University. She studies chickens. And on Tuesday, I put myself at her disposal as a free lab assistant. When I made the offer, I had no idea what I’d be doing, but I wasn’t disappointed when she told me that I’d be chasing chickens.

Well, that’s not exactly accurate. The goal of the day was to rearrange the chicken population, moving groups into different enclosures, combining and resorting some groups, to make room for the six-week-old chicks and their moms and dads that had been in smaller pens (growing families need bigger homes). Since I couldn’t touch any of the chickens, I did a lot of carrying and standing in place to discourage the birds from going into certain directions while my friend and her students did the actual capturing and moving. But for me, it was a fun day (if a bit tiring) out in the sun. And a reminder that a lot of grunt work goes into any scientific discovery.

The general goal of K-lynn’s work is to understand the evolution of communication and cognition in social species, using chickens (Gallus gallus) as a model. (Specifically Golden Sebright bantams, which are an ornamental breed developed in the 19th century by Sir John Saunders Sebright, a chicken breeder whose 1809 pamphlet on breeding domestic animals influenced Charles Darwin.)

If you’ve ever seen pictures or video of chickens being raised to eat, with hundreds or thousands packed into small spaces, the enclosures for K-lynn’s birds seem like chicken paradise. There’s tall grass, trees, a building or two for shelter, and plenty of food and water.

And if you stop and listen to the birds, you’ll hear a conversation more complex than a simple “cluck-cluck.” There are calls to say there’s danger and other calls to say there’s food. They make sounds when they meet others in their group and to claim their territory. There are at least 24 different sounds chickens make–a female even makes a sound when she lays an egg. Some calls are combined with movements, like head bobs, with a chicken picking up and then dropping food.

And did you know that chickens can count? That they prefer human music to discordant sounds? And they can even tell a Picasso from a Monet?

Knowing all of this didn’t stop me from eating chicken at dinner today. It does make me think, however, that we should care more about how our chickens are raised. But that’s a more weighty issue than I want to tackle on what should be a vacation.

2 thoughts on “A Day in the Chicken Lab

  1. I want to have chickens, but county ordinances won’t allow it, so one day I’m going to organize the neighborhood gardeners and get some new chicken policies put in place. Hope you’re having a wonderful time!

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